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HR Zone » Recruitment and Staffing » Movement at the top level.

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Movement at the top level.
Pankaj
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Posted 11-10-2018Reply

Leaders are known to be the pillars of the organization and therefore their departure can leave the company out of order.



How can this risk be minimized? What is your perspective about it?





Source: https://www.impeccablehr.com/2018/09/27/movement-at-the-top-level/
Irena
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  Rated +1 | Posted 21-10-2018

It is a good question Pankaj. I agree that leaders are important but in actual, it is the system or establishment of a company that runs it. Yes, a single person/leader could have its influence in the company to accomplish success but it is also the collective work that makes it possible. So, I don't think the departure of a single leader can't make a company out of the run. Big companies have strong departments that can lead the company without personnel. I hope you would understand my point.

Pankaj
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  Rated +1 | Posted 23-10-2018

It is a good question Pankaj. I agree that leaders are important but in actual, it is the system or ... See Irena's complete reply


Yes! I agree with your point.

Debora
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  Rated 0 | Posted 14-06-2019

In large organizations, mid-level unit leaders regularly vacate their positions for a variety of reasons, including promotions, transfers, quits, and terminations. Certainly there are reasons to expect that these departures have residual effects – both positive and negative – on the units involved.

The immediate effect of a leader exit on core member voluntary turnover rates depends on the exiting leader’s performance: turnover rates will increase in the month after a high performer exits and decrease when a low performer leaves. This hypothesis was strongly supported. Across the company there was a strong positive relationship between the performance ratings of departing leaders and the voluntary turnover rates of core (as well as other) employees. In general, when high performing unit leaders departed, some of the remaining employees in their units began leaving almost immediately, but when low performing unit leaders exited there was a downward spike in voluntary turnover rates among the remaining employees. The firm’s performance rating assessed both operational concerns (meeting sales targets and the like) and people concerns (e.g., team morale). A high rating indicates the ability to both manage the business effectively and establish positive relationships with and among subordinates. Thus, it is to be expected that in units where high performing leaders leave, employees are likely to begin harboring concerns about deteriorating working conditions and worsening interpersonal relationships.

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